Fit For Golf

Peak Performance Golf believes that playing better golf is easier than it seems. Most golfers work solely on technique and take lessons. They do not work on the most important piece of golf equipment that they possess … their bodies!

If you are struggling to lower your scores, add distance and really excel at golf and/or you are swinging with pain, feeling tired during a round of golf and your body is having problems moving like your professional wants, your body might just be the issue.

At Peak Performance Golf our “Fit Fore Golf” program has been designed specifically to help each student prepare their body to meet the demands of the golf swing.

Our students are placed through a complete array of assessments usually reserved for the best golfers in the world. This is your opportunity to train as the professional’s on the PGA and LPGA Tours do!

Through proper assessment of the body and the identification of specific physical limitations, Peak Performance Golf creates a customized corrective conditioning and exercise plan to assist you with attaining your full golfing potential!

Isn’t time to take your golf game to the next level?

Call Peak Performance Golf @ 813-714-9117  to book an appointment

Or contact us @ info@peakperformancegolf.us

Loss of Posture

Loss of posture is defined as any significant alteration from your bodies original address angles during your golf swing. This loss of posture can affect all aspects of the golf swing including timing, balance and rhythm. Losing your spine angle or changing your posture typically causes two types of miss hits; a block or a hook.

In order to not lose your posture during the golf swing, several physical characteristics must be developed. First and foremost, research has shown that any limitation in performing a full deep squat or full hip bend can force a player to lose their pelvic posture during the downswing. Failure to perform a deep means generalized stiffness and asymmetry in the musculature and joints of the lower body. Secondly, the ability to separate your upper body from your lower body allows your shoulders to rotate around your spine without altering your original posture. Limited trunk to pelvis separation is usually caused by reduced spinal mobility and shortened lat flexibility. Thirdly, the ability to stabilize your spine angle during the swing is directly proportional to the strength and stability of your core musculature (your abs and glutes). When it comes to spinal stabilization the core is the most important aspect. These muscles help keep your trunk flexed forward throughout your golf swing. Finally, in order to rotate around a stable posture one must have good flexibility in the hips and shoulders. This allows you to get the club into key positions without altering your spine angle.

Chicken Winging

Chicken winging is defined as a loss of extension or breakdown of the lead elbow through the impact zone. This swing fault makes it very difficult to develop speed or power and tends to put excessive force on the outside of the elbow joint.

In order to fully extend your lead arm and maintain a good width into the hitting zone several physical characteristics must be developed. First and foremost, lead arm strength and lead side shoulder flexibility are needed for a strong and fully extended lead arm at impact. If the arm is unable to rotate around the shoulder due to joint or muscular restrictions then a chicken wing will develop. Secondly, if your downswing is out of sequence and your club is travelling in an over the top, or out to in swing path, the lead arm is forced to chicken wing due to the direction of the forces that are applied upon it.

Early Extension

Early extension is defined as any forward movement of the lower body towards the golf during the downswing. This swing fault causes the arms and club to get stuck behind the body during the downswing, and forces the torso to rise up and elevate through the impact zone. This swing fault usually causes the block mishit and a hook. Golfers with this trait usually complain of getting stuck or trapped, this is due to the fact that the lower body has moved closer to the ball during the downswing. As a result, the body is in the way of the arms on the downswing.

In order not to early extend during the downswing several physical characteristics must be developed. First and foremost, research has shown that any limitation in performing a full deep squat or full hip bend can force a player to early extend during the downswing. Failure to perform these movements means generalized stiffness or asymmetry in the musculature and joints of the lower body. Secondly, lead hip internal rotation is necessary for allowing the lower body to fully rotate without any forward thrusts towards the golf ball. If the pelvis is unable to rotate around the lead hip due to muscular restrictions then forward and lateral movements will result. Thirdly, the ability to separate your lower body from your upper body allows the lower body to stabilize while rotating your shoulders through impact. Limited trunk to pelvis separation is usually caused by reduced spinal mobility and shortened lat flexibility. Finally, the ability to stabilize your lower body is directly proportional to abdominal strength and control of the pelvic musculature, which help control the movement of the pelvis during the downswing. These muscles help prevent the lower body from thrusting towards the golf ball during the downswing.

C-Posture

C-posture is used to describe a posture that occurs when your shoulders are slumped forward at address and you have a definitive roundness to your thoracic spine.

This posture is basically described as an excessive roundness in your upper back caused by the following:

  • Limited thoracic spine extension
  • Upper crossed syndrome = muscle imbalances
  • Scapular instability
  • Instability in the core muscles causing poor posture
  • Lack of pelvic tilt causing the upper body to bend to address the ball
  • Clubs that are too short
  • Club being gripped too much in the fingers

S-Posture

S-posture is used to describe a posture that occurs when your shoulders are slumped forward at address and you have a definitive roundness to your thoracic spine.

This posture is basically described as an excessive roundness in your upper back caused by the following:

  • Lower crossed syndrome – tightness in the hip flexors and lower back and weakness in the abdominals and glutes
  • Golfer does not understand how to bend from the hips correctly to address the ball
  • Golfer has been told to stick their tailbone out at address
  • Lack of abdominal strength or relaxing of the abdominal musculature
  • Too much flex in the knees with torso to upright

Sway

A sway is defined as any excessive lower body lateral movement away from the target during your backswing that forces your weight to the outside of your back foot. This swing fault makes it difficult to develop a proper weight transfer during the transition move from backswing to downswing. If there is no stable platform to drive your weight off of during transition, you will lose power and try to develop speed in an inefficient sequence.

In order to coil around the trail hip during the backswing, several physical characteristics must be developed. First and foremost, the trail hip internal rotation capabilities are necessary to have in order for full rotation to occur without the presence of a lateral sway. If the body is unable to rotate around the trail hip due to joint or muscular restrictions than lateral movements will result. Secondly, the ability to separate the upper body from your lower body allows the lower body to laterally stabilize while rotating during a large shoulder turn. Limited trunk to pelvis separation is usually caused by reduced spinal mobility and shortened lat flexibility. Finally, the ability to laterally stabilize your trail leg during the backswing is directly proportional to the strength and stability of the gluteal musculature. When it comes to lower body stabilization the glute medius is of utmost importance. This muscle helps prevent the trail hip from elevating and shifting laterally during an aggressive coiling of the trail hip.

Slide

A slide is defined as any excessive lower body lateral movement towards the target during your downswing. This swing fault makes it difficult to stabilize your lower body during the downswing, which will eventually rob the golfer of power and speed from the upper body through impact. Your upper body needs a stable lower body to accelerate around during the downswing. Once the lower body starts its forward shift into the downswing its job is to transfer energy to the upper body and stabilize the rotary forces that are created in the upper body, arms and club. If there is no stable platform to rotate around, players will lose power and try to develop speed in an inefficient sequence.

In order to coil around your lead hip during the downswing several physical characteristics must be developed. First and foremost, lead hip internal rotation is necessary for full rotation into the lead hip without any lateral sway. If the body is unable to rotate around the lead hip due to joint or muscular restrictions then lateral movements will occur. Secondly, the ability to separate your upper body from your lower body allows the lower body to laterally stabilize while rotating your shoulders through a full range of motion and into a full finish. Limited trunk to pelvis separation is usually caused by reduced spinal mobility and shortened lat flexibility. Finally, the ability to laterally stabilize your lead leg during the downswing is directly proportional to the strength and stability of your gluteal musculature. When it comes to lower body stabilization the glute medius is of utmost importance. This muscle helps prevent the lead hip from elevating and shifting lateral during an aggressive downswing rotation.

Trapped or Stuck

This is perhaps the most common phrase used to describe a fault that occurs among good players. They tend to feel that they are trapped or stuck on their downswing. This occurs because the arms are stuck behind the body as they transition into their downswing. As a result the misses will be a block or a hook. Most players that suffer from these misses struggle with their overall consistency and hove difficulty making solid ball to club contact.

There are several reasons why this swing fault occurs. First and foremost, we discussed early extension previously. Early extension is one of the main reasons this fault can occur. When the lower body moves closer to the ball it can cause the body to be in the way of the arms on the downswing. Secondly, the club shallows out too much on the downswing due to sliding the hips excessively toward the target. Thirdly, lack of body rotation on the downswing, particularly upper body rotation does not allow the club to move out in front of the body early enough in the downswing. Fourthly, poor alignment address and improper body angles at address. Finally, standing too close to the golf ball at address can cause the golfer to get trapped or stuck.

Over the Top

In order to prevent the golf club from coming over-the-top during the golf swing several physical characteristics must be developed. It is important to develop a proper weight transfer from your back foot to your front foot in order to start the downswing in the proper sequence. Without this initiation of the lower body during the transition a player can easily dominate the downswing with the upper body. A downswing that is initiated with the upper body usually results in the over-the-top swing plane. A proper weight transfer requires several physical factors including good balance, a strong core, and the ability to separate the lower body from the upper body.

Other causes include:

  • Weak grip at address
  • Reverse pivot
  • Reverse spine angle
  • Too much rotation of the club face on the backswing
  • Poor address position with the shoulders to level or even leaning towards the target
  • Lack of understanding of an inside approach and the correct sequence of movements

Early Release or Scooping

The early release occurs during the downswing, as the player starts the downswing there is a premature release of the wrist angles. This results in a weak impact position with the lead wrist being cupped at impact. It also adds loft to the clubface and as a result there will be a loss of power and consistency. The term early release can also be viewed when we see the lead forearm and club head form a straight line prior to making contact with the ball. Scooping is when the club head passes the hands through impact; the golfer is trying to lift the golf ball up in the air.

At impact the shaft should be leaning slightly towards the target, this helps to de-loft the club and creates a more powerful impact position.

Causes of Early Release:

  • Lack or limited contribution of the lower body during the downswing causing the upper body to over work
  • Limitations in the wrists or wrist injury
  • Over the top path and open clubface
  • Body out of position so club has to release early to catch up
  • Reverse pivot and spine angle swing faults
  • Lack of coordination
  • Understanding of proper impact positioning

Reverse Spine Angle

A reverse spine angle is defined as any excessive upper body backward bend away from the ball or any lateral bend towards the target during the backswing. This swing fault makes it very difficult to start the downswing in proper sequence, due to the lower body being placed in a position that usually limits its ability to initiate the downswing. This swing fault is also one of the prime causes of lower back pain. When the lower body can not start the downswing and has a limited ability to initiate the movement, the upper body tends to dominate the swing which will eventually create path problems and limited power generation. This swing fault puts excessive tension on the lower back due to a forced inhibition of the abdominal musculature during the backswing.

In order to maintain your spine angle during the backswing several physical characteristics must be developed. First and foremost, the ability to separate your upper body from your lower body allows your shoulders to rotate around your spine without going into backward bend or excessive target side lateral bend. Limited trunk to pelvis separation is usually caused by reduced spinal mobility and shortened lat flexibility. Secondly, trail hip internal rotation is necessary for full rotation into this hip without any lateral movement during the backswing. If the body is unable to rotate around the trail hip due to joint or muscular restrictions then a lateral sway may occur. Any lateral sway during the backswing will force the spine to tilt into backward bend and create a reverse spine angle. Finally, the ability to stabilize your spine angle during the backswing is directly proportional to the strength and stability of your core musculature. These muscles help keep your trunk forward flexed throughout your golf swing.

Flat Shoulder Plane

The flat shoulder plane is defined as having the shoulders on too much of horizontal plane during the backswing. When the lead shoulder gets to high during the backswing, the flat shoulder plane will result. This can lead too difficulty getting the ball up in the air, losing sight of the golf ball during the backswing and a change of spinal angle. To maintain a proper shoulder plane during the backswing, the shoulders must beable to rotate ninety degrees to the spinal angle set at address.

In order to maintain a proper shoulder plane there are several physical characteristics that must be developed. First and foremost, upper body mobility is of utmost importance. A full range of motion in the scapular region is required. Secondly, limited trunk to pelvis separation is usually caused by reduced spinal mobility or shortened lat flexibility can cause the lead shoulder to have to lift up during the backswing. Finally, the inability to separate the upper body from the lower body during the backswing can force the lead shoulder into a high position causing the flat shoulder plane. Make sure that you engage the core with proper pelvic tilt at address to free up range of motion.

Hanging Back

Hanging back is defined as a lack of weight transfer from the trail foot into the lead foot during the forward swing. The inability to transfer weight correctly can lead to various mishits. Topping the ball, chunking the ball, or pulling the ball can all result from this swing fault.

In order to transfer the weight correctly during the forward swing several physical characteristics must be developed. First and foremost, the trail leg must possess sufficient strength to beable to transfer weight into the lead leg during the initial stages of the forward swing. Secondly, the lead hip must have the capabilities to internally rotate. Thirdly, poor balance in both legs will limit the ability to transfer and post up over the lead leg during the forward swing. Finally, the inability to separate the lower body from the upper body during the forward swing makes it virtually impossible to transfer the weight correctly.

Loss of Swing Width

Loss of swing width can be defined as a narrowing of the swing arc especially during the backswing. This is usually caused by an immediate bending of the back arm, trying to keep the back elbow in close to the back hip. This move inhibits the ability of the golfer to perform a one piece takeaway. The larger muscles must control the movement which allows the shoulders to be set on plane early in the backswing.

In order to create swing width from the outset of the backswing, several physical characteristics must be developed. First and foremost, the ability to separate the upper body from the lower body is essential to develop width. Secondly, the neck must possess adequate flexibility to allow the shoulders to rotate without changing the head position. Thirdly, spine mobility and lat flexibility is needed to create rotation of the upper body as the arms separate and move away from it during the backswing. Finally, the spine must possess good stability to maintain posture as the arms move away from the body.

To book your Golf School

To book your Golf School now:

info@peakperformancegolf.us and please submit the reservation center form.